Seven things to consider when moving for your job

The moment that you’ve been waiting for has finally arrived; a job offer. Finding work during the last year has been a challenging task, considering everything that’s going on with the world, so this is a massive moment for you. There’s only one thing that stands in the way of you and your new position. It requires you to move away from home. While this may seem like a no-brainer at first, there are a few things you’ll have to ask yourself before making the big decision! Here are seven questions we recommend considering before moving.

  1. Is the company going to pay for your moving costs? 

There’s no doubt about it; moving can be expensive. According to Moving.com, The average cost of a local move is $1,250. The average cost of a long-distance move is $4,890 (distance of 1,000 miles). That only considers the cost of moving your belongings from one place to another, that doesn’t include up-front move-in costs for apartments, where they can ask for up to 3 months rent in advance. All of these costs are investments in a new job and a new life. In some cases, you may be short on cash because you’ve been out of work for some time. You should talk with your employer to see if they’re willing to reimburse you for moving costs. An allowance used for moving can go a long way. 

  1. How does the cost of living compare to your current city? 

As we all know, $100 doesn’t go as far in New York City as Montgomery does. That’s because the cost of living changes drastically. Rent, goods, and taxes all vary on a state-to-state basis. Making 20% more than your previous position might sound appealing, but what if the cost of living is, on average, 30% more expensive? To be more specific, relatively speaking, according to the Tax Foundation, $100 will go about as far as $115 in Alabama, while it only goes $86 in New York City. While both of these cities are on opposite sides of the spectrum, it’s recommended to consider this. 

  1. Do you see yourself growing with this company?

As we mentioned earlier, moving isn’t a small decision to make. Packing up your life and moving to a new city for a new role isn’t something you should take lightly. That’s why you need to consider your 3, 5, and 10-year plan. Whether it be within the company or the area, you need to decide whether you can see yourself growing in that environment. Keeping your long-term goals in mind is integral to the decision. 

  1. Is the area you’re moving to growing in size?

Are you moving to a city that’s experiencing a lot of growth or one that’s shrinking? One of the primary ways to tell is population size. Look at the trends over the last 1-5 years. It’s also good to take a look into the demographics. Ideally, you’re moving to an area that has a decent percentage of young professionals. Businesses in cities that are growing typically grow with the city. You’ll also want to ensure that the company is growing. Ask your prospective employer how many people they’ve taken on in the last year if you’re unsure. 

  1. What will this mean for my social life and loved ones?

Despite its location in this list, this can be one of the most critical aspects of making this decision. For someone young and single, they may not have to worry about the implications of moving as much. On the other hand, if you’re in a serious relationship or have family that would be affected by the move, you’ll have to take this into account. Moving can be tough for someone who doesn’t directly benefit from the change, especially if you’re dealing with children who have to change schools. Take some time to think about how it will affect the people around you.

 

  1. Am I the type of person that thrives in unfamiliar settings? 

This question pretty much explains itself. For some of us, moving has been an inherent part of our lives, and a new city is just a new chapter. For others, this might be the first time making such a significant change. Do you find that you enjoy being in foreign situations? Knowing your sensitivity to discomfort is essential; consider it before making a move. 

  1. Have I ever been to the location before?

Last but not least, have you ever been to the city? Much like aspiring high school students who tour the college campus before committing, it’s highly recommended that you visit a city before signing on the dotted line. When traveling, you see the considerable difference in culture between different cities. To use the same example as earlier, someone who loves living in New York City might have difficulty finding their tempo in Montgomery. Take a trip to the prospective job location and try to see how you feel. 

Suffice to say, there are many essential questions you need to ask yourself before making the decision. Moving for work can be a life-changing opportunity. You’ll just have to make sure that it makes sense for you! If you do decide that moving makes sense, give us a call, and we’ll be able to help you. 

Alex Tiburzi

Alex is a South Florida native who got into real estate in 2017. He started a land investing business that bought vacant land all over Florida. In 2019 he decided he wanted to take his career to the next level. He began that as a leasing agent for Mayfair and worked his way up to becoming the leasing manager. He’s been enlisted to oversee the leasing of 400+ units all over South Florida. His background in real estate gave him the ability to excel in the position. Alex is also a part of the Mayfair Real Estate team. He enjoys his career because everyday presents a new challenge to overcome. In his freetime, Alex enjoys reading, writing, and spending time outdoors. Alex has a long term goal of helping as many people as possible in building their real estate portfolio, as well as his own.

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